Should You Get an MCM?

If you’re thinking about obtaining your Master of Communication Management (MCM) degree, you might wonder how your education will fit with your current career choice. Professionals on many career paths, including you, can benefit from an MCM.

Public Relations Specialists Enjoy Excellent Growth Potential

 
Should You Get an MCM?

Image via Flickr by tec_estromberg

USC Annenberg reports that public relations professionals can benefit greatly from  a master’s degree-in communication management. According to U.S. News & World Report, public relations specialists hold one of the best creative and media jobs available thanks to the profession’s excellent growth potential and salary prospects.

The U.S. News & World Report reveals that public relations specialists earn a median salary of $55,680. Those in the top 75th percentile earn about $76,630. Additionally, public relations professionals enjoy excellent upward mobility, with many opportunities for advancement. If you’re interested in a career in public relations, an MCM degree could help put you in a better position to advance your career.

Marketing Directors Can Boost Their Salary Potential

While public relations specialists work primarily with the media, marketing directors “oversee the marketing strategies of an organization or business,” according to USC Annenberg. These professionals manage budgets and create marketing campaigns that can encompass multiple forms of media. Marketing directors must also stay current on trends in the industry so that they can apply that knowledge to their work.

USC Annenberg reports that marketing directors earn an average annual salary of $87,000, and that professionals with the ability to multitask and the desire to take on complex challenges might further excel in this position. According to Jessica Stillman of CBS Money Watch, a master’s degree can add as much as 20 percent more money to your prospective salary.

Journalism Professionals Report High Levels of Job Satisfaction

You could also consider a career as a journalist. You might work for a newspaper, a radio station, a television network, or an Internet publication, depending on your strengths and preferences. Writing for the Pew Research Center, Monica Anderson reports that recent graduates with bachelor’s and master’s degrees have reported high levels of job satisfaction in their subsequent careers.

According to Anderson, some professionals have expressed concern about dwindling job opportunities in journalism. However, career opportunities in mobile and online content, plus other technology-based fields, have provided employment prospects for talented graduates.

Additionally, journalist Mina al-Oraibi of the World Economic Forum reveals that quality and credibility will characterize the future of journalism. It’s possible that well-educated and dedicated professionals in this industry will create sustainable careers for themselves, especially if they embrace changes in the industry.

Whether you’re looking forward to a career as a public relations specialist, a journalist, or a marketing director, an MCM degree could expand your job prospects and your salary potential. Gaining a master’s-degree-level education can open up new career opportunities and help you explore your options more fully.

 

SOURCES CONSULTED FOR THE ARTICLE:

http://communicationmgmt.usc.edu/

http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/public-relations-specialist

 

SOURCES LINKED TO IN THE ARTICLE:

http://communicationmgmt.usc.edu/msp-resources/articles-blogs/4-careers-for-communication-majors/

http://www.cbsnews.com/media/10-careers-where-a-masters-degree-pays-off/7/

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/08/06/the-job-market-tightens-but-new-journalism-grads-remain-upbeat/

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2015/08/credibility-is-future-of-journalism